FalconEarlyBirds~The Round Body Years 1960-1963 1/2

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Author Topic: Windshield Install on a 1963 Falcon Sedan  (Read 7811 times)

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oldbleu

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Windshield Install on a 1963 Falcon Sedan
« on: Jun 29, 2015, 08:04:33 PM »

After what seemed like 10 years, I have finally been able to devote some time to finishing my '63 Falcon sedan (Barney). After getting the headliner put in, I focused on getting the front and back windshield glass installed. The same person who removed the glass just prior to painting was the same person who I had come out to the house to install the new stuff. I tried to follow along as the installer went to work. My goal is to give some of you, who have not seen this process, get a look at how it is done. 

Way back when the car was painted, all of the window glass was removed. The windshield was original and in need of replacement. I looked high and low for a CarLite or LOF "new old stock" replacement, but came up empty. I settled on a Chinese replacement simply because I could not get a reasonably priced alternative. The part number is DW584 with shade and is available at most auto glass suppliers.  The good news is that the "Off Shore" replacement is DOT approved so at least there is a minimum level of quality.


 
As for the weatherstripping seals, I was able to find "new old stock" items from various vendors on the internet. I was very lucky to find original Ford seals that were in excellent condition even though they were 30+ years old. They showed no signs of aging and the rubber was soft and pliable.  Even the cardboard factory boxes were in good condition. The front glass seal part number is C0DB-6403110-C and the rear is a C2DZ-6242084-A. The front seal works for all Falcons, except the convertible and hardtop, from 1960-65. The rear seal works on the Falcon sedan square-back models from 1962-65.



Another item, used extensively during the installation, was a can of 3M Silicone Lubricant Plus (wet).  This stuff seems to make the job fairly easy (if you know what you are doing).  The installer did not use any sealer. When I asked about this, he said that if the sealer sets up before the glass is in place, things can get ugly. He also said that if the windshield leaks, he can put sealer into the problem area after the fact and take care of business. Since I don't plan on doing much driving in the rain, I am not too worried. I will check for leaks when I get the opportunity to wash the car.



The first order of business was to fit the seal to the windshield glass. The weather stripping fit perfectly. Next, the perimeter stainless steel trim parts were inserted into the seal and positioned in their respective positions. The windshield has a total of six trim pieces, of which all are inserted into the seal except for the two upper corner parts. The four main stainless steel trim pieces must be properly inserted in the weather stripping prior to installing the assembly into the car. The pieces cannot be put in after the windshield has been fitted into the car.



The windshield was then flipped over and the nylon installation rope was inserted in the body groove, all the way around the seal.



The rope goes into the same groove that will ultimately be occupied by the sheet metal that surrounds the windshield. A soft plastic stick is used to help with the process of getting the rope in the correct place. 



Once the rope is where it needs to be, a thin layer of silicone lube is sprayed onto the rope and the inner surface of the seal. You can see in the above picture that the ends of the installation rope have been taped to the inside of the windshield. Proper preparation is the key to a smooth installation.



Two suction cup handles are stuck on the outside of the glass and pumped to form a good solid seal. Now for the fun part. The glass is carried over to the car and carefully set in place. The placement of the lower lip of the seal is such that straddles the sheet metal. Once the installer has the glass and seal exactly where he wants it, he begins to remove the installation rope. Usually it is best to have a helper pushing on the glass near where the rope is pulling the seal over the lip of the sheet metal. This will help to make sure the inner portion of the seal gets over the sheet metal lip and secures the glass to the car body.

If you haven't seen this process performed before, it is worth watching it done. When the rope is pulled out, it brings the inner portion of the seal with it, causing the inner portion of the seal to wind up on the inner side of the sheet metal of the car body. The installer works his way around the perimeter of the windshield, slowly pulling the rope out and making sure that the seal is going where it is supposed to. Once all of the rope is out, the windshield is basically installed.

On the Falcon, a few more steps are necessary to complete the job. Two small sheet metal screws are installed back in their original holes through the stainless trim at the lower corner of the windshield. The upper piece of stainless trim gets a screw on each end. These two screws are covered by the upper corner molding pieces that get installed next. Getting these two "L" shaped trim pieces in place can be a little bit tricky. Although the two parts appear to be the same, they are different, but only slightly so. In the past, I have positioned the upper portion of the "L" molding by sliding in onto the existing piece and then snapping the lower portion over the vertical trim piece. Your mileage may vary.

This entire process is somewhat different from more modern installations where new car windshield glass is more or less glued in. I don't know how they remove the windshield from a more modern car without breaking it. Another aspect of this process involves having the proper tools and the necessary talent and training to get the job performed correctly without breaking something. As Clint Eastwood once said, "A man has to know his limitations". That is why I paid an expert to get the job done right, the first time.

I will show how the rear glass was installed in the next segment of this thread.  ;)


     
   
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63 Gasser

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Re: Windshield Install on a 1963 Falcon Sedan
« Reply #1 on: Jun 30, 2015, 09:17:49 AM »

 Very nice! I love seeing guys put these old windshields in, as it seems to be a dying art!
 As for pulling newer glued windshields; it's very easy to do and not break them. I slip a sharp blade between the glass and the channel, until it's made a passage through the butyl adhesive. Then I work very thin stainless wire, or piano wire through the passage. Put one person on each end of the wire, and using a sawing motion, work the wire all around the glass. Once you get back to the starting point, the windshield is free and ready to lift out. I've removed many for restoration or repair, and put them back in later. Hate to see a good one just broken, if it can be used again.
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oldbleu

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Re: Windshield Install on a 1963 Falcon Sedan
« Reply #2 on: Jun 30, 2015, 08:53:36 PM »

I was kind of cool watching him do his thing. It was nice that he came out to the house and took care of business in the shade in the driveway.

I can't imagine trying to tackle the removal of the windshield in my new Ford. I watched a guy replace a cracked windshield in my 2013 Escape. He told me that Ford windshields were harder to get out as compared to most other cars. That beauty was really stuck to the car.   

Due to some unexpected bungling on my part, I now need to find a driver's side window glass for my 63 sedan.   :-[


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oldbleu

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Re: Windshield Install on a 1963 Falcon Sedan
« Reply #3 on: Jun 30, 2015, 10:25:33 PM »

In the first post of this thread, I neglected to mention that the sheet metal that surrounds the windshield was prepped during the early stages of the paint process. Typically, these areas have numerous sharp edges that can cause the rubber seal to become hung up. These edges can also easily cut your fingers. Ask me how I know.   :bangh:



Using a grinder and a file, the factory spot welds were massaged and smoothed so that the new weather stripping would go back in as easily as possible. During the original assembly process, Ford never performed this little detail. The guy who re-installed the windshield noticed it immediately.   ;D

The rear window was re-installed in the same manner as the front windshield. The glass I used was the same piece that came out of the car at the beginning of the paint process. This piece of glass is apparently not reproduced so about the only source for a replacement glass would be a wrecking yard or a used parts vendor. While the car was being painted, I stored this glass in a location where it would not be damaged.



As with the windshield, the rear weather stripping seal was fitted to the glass. Once again, the factory Ford seal fit perfectly.



Next, the five stainless trim pieces were fitted together and inserted into the rubber seal. The square back rear glass does not have a lower trim piece like the earlier bubble top Falcons. All of the stainless steel trim pieces had previously been sent out to a custom metal polishing shop where they were straightened and buffed to a show quality shine.

Next, the nylon installation rope was fitted into the seal.  Once again, you can see the ends of the rope taped to the inside of the glass.



The rear glass was set in the car and the inner portion of the seal was slipped into place by slowly pulling the rope out of the weather stripping. As we did before, the installer was in the car pulling the rope while I was outside putting gentle pressure on the glass in the area where the rope was being removed.   

As you can see in the last picture, the installation came out perfect. Now I can move on to getting the rest of the side glass put back in.   8)


 

 
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63 Gasser

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Re: Windshield Install on a 1963 Falcon Sedan
« Reply #4 on: Jul 02, 2015, 04:14:18 PM »

 Thanks for the post! Did you get a new seal for the rear also, or was yours reusable? My rear glass is the same as yours, and I didn't realize they were no longer available!? Good to know, but not a good feeling to know it can't be purchased!
 My rear seal is split badly in spots, and the 1/4" wide gaps have been filled with black RTV. I also need a windshield, and seal, as mine is cracked, and generally hard to see out. Rear glass is good, but has some stains that appear to be permanent, as thorough cleaning wont remove them.
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oldbleu

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Re: Windshield Install on a 1963 Falcon Sedan
« Reply #5 on: Jul 05, 2015, 02:51:01 PM »

The guy who installed the glass told me that the rear window for square back Falcons is not reproduced. I have not done any research on the internet to see if he is correct on that.  As I mentioned at the beginning of the thread, I managed to get both the front and rear window seals "new old stock". I took me about 18 months of looking and waiting. Actually, I scored the rear one before I found the front. The Falcon parts suppliers generally only sell reproduction stuff, most of which is made in China. The good stuff is usually in somebody's garage and was purchased for a project that never got finished. 

The seals I acquired were brand spanking new and came in their respective factory cardboard boxes. It's another one of those deals where I was in the right place at the right time. All of the old seals on the car were petrified, cracked and hard as a rock. Even if I wanted to save them, they were too far gone.  I had the new seals on the shelf before I began the paint process.

As you already know, the rear glass usually does not require replacement. The rear and side windows just aren't subjected to the same punishment that the windshield gets. I doubt it will be too hard for you to find a nice, used rear window.  Since the same glass was used on both two doors and four doors, there are lots of potential parts cars out there.


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